Propspeed

More Speed, Less Fuel.


Propspeed is the original propeller and running gear foul release coating system, specially formulated to prevent marine growth from bonding to metal surfaces below the water line

Lightspeed

More Light, Less Fuss - COMING SOON


Our latest release - an innovative foul release coating system specifically formulated for underwater lights

Propspeed

For the Boat Captain

I only ever use Propspeed on my boat’s running gear, due to its superior performance and durability over any other product. End of story!”

Barnaby Newton
Skipper, 82ft Viking, Ata Rangi
Why Boat Captains use Propspeed
Propspeed

For the Boat Yard

It really adds something new to the industry - protecting your running gear and propellers, and increasing fuel efficiency - so to us, it’s a no brainer. Why wouldn’t you use it?

Chris Ward
Paint Department Manager, Bay Ship & Yacht Co. San Francisco, USA
Why Boat Yards choose Propspeed
Propspeed

For the Boat Owner

I’m a Propspeed convert. Will it be going on all my boat's running gear surfaces for this and all future summers? You bet it will!”

Jasen Gast
Owner of the Sport Fisher "Rehab"
Why Boat Owners use Propspeed

Manta Ray tagging with Propspeed

Aug 23, 2017, 13:43 PM by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author
To test if the NZ mantas are indeed resident year round, Conservation International and NZ Department of Conservation are teaming up (with the support of Propspeed) to deploy satellite tags on Mantas from 20-23 March 2017.

The Oceanic Manta Ray (Manta birostris) has been reported by New Zealand fishermen off the coast of the north island for over a decade now, but observations have generally been restricted to the summer months, and many scientists believed these were just migrants passing through NZ waters during the warmer summer months. Recent studies on oceanic Mantas in Mexico, Peru, Indonesia and Sri Lanka show them to be much more “site-attached” or resident than previously believed, raising the strong possibility that the oceanic mantas seen off the east coast of the north island of NZ in summer months are actually resident year-round in NZ waters. This is further supported by the fact that oceanic Mantas are only extremely rarely sighted in neighboring Australia and the islands around NZ (including New Caledonia and Tonga).

To test if the NZ mantas are indeed resident year round, Conservation International and NZ Department of Conservation are teaming up (with the support of Propspeed) to deploy satellite tags on Mantas from 20-23 March 2017.

These satellite tags will remain on the mantas for up to 6-12 months, allowing us to see where the Manta Ray are going during the colder winter months. The tags will be deployed by a pole spear and are anchored temporarily in the manta’s dorsum with a titanium dart tip. The tags release after a 6-12 month pre-programmed period.While the tags are on the Mantas, they record depth and temperature readings every 10 seconds, while also taking GPS fixes every time the Mantas come to the surface to feed or cruise and the tag’s antenna breaks the surface of the water. The results of this tagging work will hopefully show conclusively if the Mantas are indeed resident in NZ waters year round, and give a good idea of their movements throughout this time. This will be important both for managing the population of this endangered, world-wide protected species and for potentially developing a local tourism industry around them. Manta watching tourism is rapidly growing around the world as their popularity increases, as the world’s smartest fish.

Manta Ray tagging with Propspeed

Aug 23, 2017, 13:43 PM by Telerik.Sitefinity.DynamicTypes.Model.Authors.Author
To test if the NZ mantas are indeed resident year round, Conservation International and NZ Department of Conservation are teaming up (with the support of Propspeed) to deploy satellite tags on Mantas from 20-23 March 2017.

The Oceanic Manta Ray (Manta birostris) has been reported by New Zealand fishermen off the coast of the north island for over a decade now, but observations have generally been restricted to the summer months, and many scientists believed these were just migrants passing through NZ waters during the warmer summer months. Recent studies on oceanic Mantas in Mexico, Peru, Indonesia and Sri Lanka show them to be much more “site-attached” or resident than previously believed, raising the strong possibility that the oceanic mantas seen off the east coast of the north island of NZ in summer months are actually resident year-round in NZ waters. This is further supported by the fact that oceanic Mantas are only extremely rarely sighted in neighboring Australia and the islands around NZ (including New Caledonia and Tonga).

To test if the NZ mantas are indeed resident year round, Conservation International and NZ Department of Conservation are teaming up (with the support of Propspeed) to deploy satellite tags on Mantas from 20-23 March 2017.

These satellite tags will remain on the mantas for up to 6-12 months, allowing us to see where the Manta Ray are going during the colder winter months. The tags will be deployed by a pole spear and are anchored temporarily in the manta’s dorsum with a titanium dart tip. The tags release after a 6-12 month pre-programmed period.While the tags are on the Mantas, they record depth and temperature readings every 10 seconds, while also taking GPS fixes every time the Mantas come to the surface to feed or cruise and the tag’s antenna breaks the surface of the water. The results of this tagging work will hopefully show conclusively if the Mantas are indeed resident in NZ waters year round, and give a good idea of their movements throughout this time. This will be important both for managing the population of this endangered, world-wide protected species and for potentially developing a local tourism industry around them. Manta watching tourism is rapidly growing around the world as their popularity increases, as the world’s smartest fish.